Announcements

  • Cancellation for Public Star Party at Covington Community Park

    Event on 2018-09-14 posted about 1 month ago

    This Public Star Party at Covington Community Park (star party event) scheduled for Sep 14, 2018, 07:00 PM is cancelled due to inclement weather.

  • Comet viewing opportunity

    posted about 1 month ago

    You can see periodic comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner with binoculars in the pre-dawn sky without moonlight interference  through September 23. It is quite beautiful in a telescope. The comet passes near M35 on September 15 and heads deeper into Gemini during late September. This is a favorable approach and the comet is bright enough to see in binoculars from a dark suburban site. Refer to the Sky & Telescope web site for details at:

  • Reminder for Astrophotography Special Interest Group Meeting

    Event on 2018-09-11 posted about 1 month ago

    This is just a friendly reminder that the Astrophotography Special Interest Group Meeting (astrophotography event) is scheduled for Sep 11, 2018, 07:00 PM. Please come out and join us! We’ll be holding an open session on Imaging Automation with SGP and PHD. Bring any questions you have about getting your rig up and running and we’ll discuss/troubleshoot as a group! Bring your logs if you can, as well! I hope to see many of you there!

  • Cancellation for Rattlesnake Mountain Trailhead Star Party

    Event on 2018-09-08 posted about 1 month ago

    This Rattlesnake Mountain Trailhead Star Party (star party event) scheduled for Sep 08, 2018, 06:00 PM is cancelled due to inclement weather.

  • View Four Bright Planets

    posted about 2 months ago

    Four bright planets are visible in the early evening during August and most of September. Venus, low in the west, is the brightest and will be the first "star" you are able to see as evening twilight begins to darken the sky. Two other bright planets, Mars and Jupiter, also become visible during early twilight. Mars is low in the southeast as evening begins.  Mars is not quite as as bright as Venus, but glows with a distinct orange color, quite unlike the pure white color of Venus. Jupiter is in the southwest, above and to the left of Venus. Jupiter is about the same brightness as Mars but has a warm-white color. All three planets are brighter than any true star and are striking when seen against the dark blue sky of early twilight. As the evening sky continues to darken, Saturn will become visible in the south, among the stars of the constellation Sagittarius. Although Saturn isn’t nearly as bright as Mars or Jupiter, the ringed planet is brighter than any star in this area of sky and isn’t hard to recognize.

    Throughout August and early September Mars remains nearly as large and bright as it was at the end of July. Mars rises a bit earlier and moves a bit toward the south each day. By early September, Mars is located roughly due south by the end of evening twilight. Unfortunately, Venus gets a bit lower in the western sky and sets a bit earlier each day. By mid-September Venus will only be a few degrees above the horizon as twilight begins, and will be challenging to spot.