Announcements

  • Reminder for Astrophotography Special Interest Group Meeting

    Event on 2018-11-13 posted about 1 month ago

    This is just a friendly reminder that the Astrophotography Special Interest Group Meeting (astrophotography event) is scheduled for Nov 13, 2018, 07:00 PM. Please come out and join us!

    Wayne Hixson will be showing us the ins-and-outs of Astro Pixel Processor - another processing program available which has some very cool capabilities (especially for processing mosaics).  You can check out the details here: https://www.astropixelprocessor.com

  • Board Elections November 21st

    posted about 1 month ago

    Board elections will occur at the November 21st  SAS meeting. The current list of positions and nominees are; President – John McLaren; Secretary – Mary Anderson, Treasurer – David Hoover; VP Education – David Ingram; VP Activities – Rayna Bauer; VP Membership – Jon Minnick; VP Publicity – no nominee. Information on responsibilities for all positions is under the About>Bylaws tabs.

    We would like to identify at least one volunteer for the VP Publicity position before the meeting on the 21st. If you are interested in volunteering for any of these positions, you can nominate yourself. If you have suggested nominees or wish to nominate yourself, please email Board@SeattleAstro.org. We will also accept nominations for all positions from the floor at the membership meeting.

    On behalf of all SAS members, we thank outgoing elected board members Peter Moore, Russ Coad and Greg Scheiderer for their service.

  • Reminder for Third Quarter Moon Members-Only Star Party

    Event on 2018-11-03 posted about 2 months ago

    This is just a friendly reminder that the Third Quarter Moon Members-Only Star Party (star party event) is scheduled for Nov 03, 2018, 08:00 PM. Please join us. If weather is bad, on Nov. 1, 2, and 3, the Museum of Flight will offer great events for all space and astronomy fans: Free Thursday Night events, Nov. 1 and Space Expo 2018, Nov. 2 and 3. See the MOF site for details: http://www.museumofflight.org

  • Stargazing in Seattle: November’s Leonids

    posted about 2 months ago

    Prime time to watch this year's Leonid meteor shower will be during the early morning hours of Saturday, November 17 and Sunday, November 18, between moonset and dawn. This shower typically produces about 10 to 15 meteors per hour when viewed from a dark site. A gibbous moon will brighten the sky before it sets at 12:48 am on Saturday morning and 1:52 am on Sunday morning (PST). The sky remains dark after moonset and ideal for meteor watching until nautical morning twilight begins about 6:05 am. To look for meteors, find a site away from bright lights, ideally in the country, and just watch the sky overhead. Dress very warmly and use a reclining lounge chair if possible; otherwise you can simply lie down on a blanket on the ground.  You will need to stay in the dark for at least 10 to 15 minutes to let your eyes become dark adapted, and be patient. The meteors arrive randomly and many minutes may pass before you see one. The Leonid meteor shower is associated with debris from periodic comet Tempel-Tuttle and is famous because it has produced meteor storms with rates up to a thousand meteors an hour or more in the past. The most recent storm occurred in 2001, but no storm is predicted for this year.

  • Stargazing in Seattle Notes: Moon and Hyades

    posted about 2 months ago

    On the evening of Friday October 26 through the morning of Saturday Oct 27 the Moon will pass in front of the Hyades star cluster and occult (cover) numerous bright stars. Stars will disappear behind the bright limb of the moon and this event will be difficult to see. Stars remain hidden behind the moon for up to about an hour and then suddenly reappear at the dark limb. Watching the reappearance of a bright star with a telescope can be spectacular. The best event is the reappearance of a 5.6 magnitude star at about 1:00 am. Other notable reappearance events occur at about 11:10 pm, 12:41 and 12:42 am, 1:38 and 1:39 am, 2:55 and 2:58 am, 4:18 and 4:28 am. These times are only accurate to within a few minutes and depend on your exact location as well as the accuracy of my planetarium program, so you should start watching at least five or ten minutes before the predicted time. 
     
    Bob